Pilgrimage for Justice Across Borders for All Children: Preamble

When Kristy Nabhan-Warren & I set off today (celebrating her birthday along the way), we will be traveling at least 600 miles along the U.S./Mexico border in a 1500-2000 mile pilgrimage to listen to residents from both sides of the border, to stand with them as they struggle for greater justice & to find a greater context for what is going on with our current refugee crisis than radio & tv sound bites can permit. Yesterday, I spent the afternoon ...

Continue Reading →
0

Pilgrimage for Justice Across Borders for All Children – She’s on your case Mr. Sessions.

Don’t talk to me about your patriotism, Mr. Sessions,
When you won’t protect our country from the Russians,
From Koreans and from hate-mongers within our own country.

We’d rather see you express some patriotism,
a touch of compassion for those who need it the most.

After all, you’re an old post-reproductive man, Mr. Sessions,
& have nothing to lose by showing your feminine side (if any)
To demonstrate your full humanness.

No ...

Continue Reading →
0

Pilgrimage for Justice Across Borders – Let’s put these Children’s Welfare Before our own Ideologies.

An overwhelming majority of Americans from all political parties want to see the entire range of minors in the so-called child detention camps—from infants in their first year of life to seventeen year-olds in those facilities— better cared for, and more quickly reunited with their parents, wherever they may be. However, our country seems divided about what is actually happening in those facilities—from infants in their first year of life to seventeen year-olds in those (often makeshift) facilities that are ...

Continue Reading →
0

The Upcoming Pilgrimage for Justice Across Borders for all Children

Stay tuned the next two weeks at my cousin, Dr. Kristy Nabhan-Warren of the University of Iowa joins me on the border to blog together about what is happening on the ground to help the many Central American & Mexican children caught between a rock & a hard place.

They have been sidelined and set back by divisive immigration policies & developmentally insensitive child care protocols which have separated infants from their mothers, brothers and sisters.

Here is an image at the ...

Continue Reading →
0

Restore the Spirit of the Human Commons in which we work and play…

With less than 7 weeks before my new book Food from the Radical Center is available to you from Island Press, I wanted to alert you to the fact that you can get a 20% discount using the discount code “4NABHAN” when you order through www.islandpress.org/radical-center.

But I also wanted to offer you the reason why I’ve spent two years doing fieldwork & writing about biocultural & eco-gastronomic restoration: “The ultimate goals of restoration are not merely to heal & ...

Continue Reading →
0

Keep your eyes open for this fall, only you can make a difference.

It seems that our jefe’s entire regime is crashing & falling apart faster than a 250 pound bag of chickenshit thrown off of a tower. But we must keep one eye on this fall & the other on the ones already damaged and marginalized by months of bad policies, from the babies without mothers in the tent camps of Tornillo and Yuma, to the farmers who have just been caught in the crossfire of tariff wars.

It is easy to feel ...

Continue Reading →
0

We need both kinds of work to come together as one, rather than being endeavors.

Many of us work to save species, habitats, seeds, breeds and the earth itself. Others work to ensure that the fruits of these labors—the healthy food harvested from restored landscapes—actually reaches our communities—including the elderly, infirm or otherwise disadvantaged—to benefit them, to delight them, to nourish them and to enliven their sensory responses to this beautiful, delicious world we live within.

Savoring the world does not mean consuming it as much as valuing its species and peoples and landscapes for their ...

Continue Reading →
0

There is No Such Thing as the World’s Best Tomato!

Dear Jere Gettle and Friends at Baker Creek Seeds, Have you gone nuts or just gotten greedy? THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS THE WORLD’S BEST TOMATO. There is simply an astonishing diversity of tomatoes, each of which tastes great in different climates, under different growing conditions used in different recipes.

Now quit trying to sell us silver bullet “superfoods” and get back ...

Continue Reading →
0

Fifty-Two Palestinians Killed and 2500 Injured by the Israeli Military in Just One Day

Fifty-Two Palestinians Killed and 2500 Injured by the Israeli Military in Just One Day, as Jared Kushner and Ivanka Trump smile for a photo op at the U.S. Embassy in Jerusalem? I am inconsolable about the loss of life on the Palestine-Israel border today, and how Trump and Netanyahu have placed citizens of both countries in further danger.

After visiting Israel and the ...

Continue Reading →
0

KCRW – Good Food – Tucson’s foodways

In 2015, Tucson was named the first UNESCO City of Gastronomy in the U.S. due to the region’s more than 4,000 year-old agricultural history, among other reasons. Gary Nabhan is an ethnobotanist and the founding director of regional food studies at the University of Arizona.

He recently authored a report on the state of Tucson’s food system and visits to talk about the significance of the designation.

 

 

______________________

This originally broadcasted May 12, 2018 on KCRW.

 

Continue Reading →
0

Be on the look for Mesquite: An Arboreal Love Affair my forthcoming book from Chelsea Green Publishing

Be on the look for Mesquite: An Arboreal Love Affair my forthcoming book from Chelsea Green Publishing, with a forewood by the legendary Petey Mesquitey.

FROM A PREVIEW ALREADY ON THE WOOD-WIDE WEB::

In his latest book, Mesquite, Gary Paul Nabhan employs humor and contemplative reflection to convince readers that they have never really glimpsed the essence of what he calls “arboreality.”

As a ...

Continue Reading →
0

Saving Our Food Supply in the Face of Climate Change

In the already-scorching Southwest, a group of scientists, ranchers and farmers are figuring out how to adapt the current agricultural system for a hotter, drier planet.

A smoldering vista southeast of Tucson, Arizona—a city that saw 68 days of temperatures at 100°F or higher last year, and averages less than 12 inches of rainfall annually. Photos by Russ Schleipman.

Gary Paul Nabhan ...

Continue Reading →
0

There’s more to agave than tequila

You can sip me, you can eat me and you can moisturize with me—what am I? The agave plant.

Today, this plant is widely known as the key ingredient in the alcoholic beverage that is taken with lime and salt or mixed in to make margaritas, but agave has a much greater importance in the Sonoran Desert than just tequila.

“We think about tequila as the major way we know the plant today, but up until a century ago more people ate ...

Continue Reading →
0

Native Chiltepine pepper in Southern Arizona

Something other than coffee is brewing at Exo Roast Co. Along with the typical coffee beverages like lattes, cappuccinos, and chai, Exo Roast Co. also offers something with a little extra kick to it—a chiltepine cold brew.

“It sprung from an interest in using local ingredients,” Doug Smith, co-owner of Exo Roast Co., said.

From the very beginning Smith knew he wanted to incorporate local ingredients into his menu. As someone who likes the sweet, savory combination of chocolate ...

Continue Reading →
0

A rather remarkable visit from two great restoration ecologists, James and Thibaud Aronson.

A rather remarkable visit from two great restoration ecologists this last week, James and Thibaud Aronson… they are in the thick of discussions among public health scientists and ecological restoration scientists about how restored habitats not only buffer us from the arrival of pests, diseases and weeds, but directly improve human health and well-being.

We probably need a 1000 more scientists like them working on the connection between the health of the soil microbiome and that of the human microbiome alone… ...

Continue Reading →
0

Shifts in Plant Chemical Defenses of Chile Pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) Due to Domestication in Mesoamerica

We propose that comparisons of wild and domesticated Capsicum species can serve as a model system for elucidating how crop domestication influences biotic and abiotic interactions mediated by plant chemical defenses. Perhaps no set of secondary metabolites (SMs) used for plant defenses and human health have been better studied in the wild and in milpa agro-habitats than those found in Capsicum species. However, very few scientific studies on SM variation have been conducted in both the domesticated landraces of chile ...

Continue Reading →
0

When we get outside to work we harvest an even more delicious capacity to respect one another.

So should it be any surprise that when we break bread and eat together with people from backgrounds different than our own, fear falls away and we find previously unanticipated common ground?

If there is a corollary to that principle, it is that when we get outside to work side by side together to restore food-producing landscapes and to recover historically declining food species or varieties, we harvest an even more delicious capacity to respect one another and move toward long-term ...

Continue Reading →
0

ThE bOrDeR iS nOt A wAr ZoNe

National Guardsmen, Go Home!
Today 330 National Guard troops
came to the Arizona-Sonora border
12 miles south of our home,
one for nearly every mile of the state’s line;
They are likely to break more laws
than they will enforce.
Even the Border Patrol
is better trained on human rights
& on respecting wildlife laws.
The Border Patrol needs more INTEL
to stop drug runners, their drones
and their ultralights that fly over my home
nearly every night, not an ...

Continue Reading →
0

In the Arizona Desert, Tucson Models Affordable Food Access

UNESCO’s first City of Gastronomy in the U.S. relies on its built-in biodiversity and a wide network of food justice organizations to feed its most marginalized residents.

Tucson is a foodie town. But rather than artisan breads and local avocados drawing crowds of tourists, it’s the relationship between diverse plants and people that earned it the distinction of being the first UNESCO City of Gastronomy in the United States in 2015.

The UNESCO distinction came as a result of ...

Continue Reading →
0

The elders hate the feeling that their grandchildren will have to leave their homes to find livable wages and satisfying livelihoods.

In rural areas I know well, the elders I know love the land but hate the feeling that their grandchildren will have to leave their homes and move elsewhere to find livable wages and satisfying livelihoods.

What if we helped them find jobs helping to recover rare wild food species and to increase the food-producing capacity of their rural landscapes through restoring habitats for fish and game, wild foraged plants and other non-timber natural products? What if family members had a ...

Continue Reading →
0
Page 4 of 28 «...23456...»