Food Heritage and History

Weekday – The Diversity of Seeds

The Diversity of Seeds

Time: 54:01 minute audio
Date: January 8th, 2008
Publisher:
KUOW – 94.9 FM

Steve Scher talked to Gary Nabhan in January (KUOW) about the Diversity of Seeds, and you can listen to it at KUOW or below. Gary joins the program about 31 minutes into the clip. Listen to the entire show. It is very educational!

 

 

 

 

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Taking Stock of Successes with Local Foods

It was a wild way to break in the New Year, sharing local game and fish with hunters who donated their venison, pronghorn antelope backstrap and javelina “pork roasts” to their friends at the Cattle Baron in Flagstaff, Arizona. As we were sitting waiting for the first meat to come out of the roasting pit, I began to daydream about whether such an event would have even been “on my screen” some twenty years ago, as the local foods movement was ...

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Some Like It Hot

Listen to this Interview

CURWOOD: Those red hot chili peppers that appear next to entrees on many restaurant menus today can mean different things to different people. Some might consider them a hot, yet savory, challenge, while others see them as red flags – a warning to sensitive taste buds.

Whether you like your food spicy or not is a personal choice, but as Gary Nabhan contends, it’s also likely to be ...

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The Geography of Flavor

Bringing a European Idea Down to Earth: Producers, Farmers Pin Hopes on the Appeal of ‘Terroir’

By Jane Black Washington Post Staff Writer
Wednesday, August 22, 2007; Page F01

It was a risky move back in 2004 for Arlin Wasserman to launch his Minneapolis consultancy, Changing Tastes. His expertise: the esoteric concept of “terroir,” a French term that literally translates as terrain but has come to mean the way foods and wine express the soil, climate, ...

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Localvore Hero

Talking maple syrup with a Southwest grow-it guru

by: Suzanne Podhaizer (08/08/07)

Gary Paul Nabhan has hunted wild peccaries, pit-roasted cactus flowers, and won a MacArthur “genius” fellowship. This past weekend, he was the keynote speaker at the 12th Annual Vermont Fresh Network Forum. The theme of the gathering was “Eat It to Save It” and focused on bringing back indigenous foods, such as heirloom veggies and heritage animal breeds that are becoming extinct. ...

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Long Before the First Thanksgiving

By: Gary Paul Nabhan, RAFT founder

Gary Paul Nabhan is a MacArthur Fellow, cofounder of Native Seeds/SEARCH, and author of numerous books and articles on ethnobotany, nutrition, and plant conservation.

Try to recall the most remarkable lunch you’ve ever had in a grade school. Mine was remarkable not only because of the food that was served, but also because of the people—both young and old—with whom I ate. It was the people’s cultural traditions and their link with their distinctive ...

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Deepening Our Sense of What Is Local and Regional Food

Now that Time magazine has done a cover feature article on the local foods movement and a book on the same topic by bestselling author Barbara Kingsolver and her family is poised to climb up the New York Times top-ten non-fiction list, we might want to ask what actually is it that we want to promote by using phrases like “ Buy Fresh, Buy Local”. I can assure you that there will be increasing criticism of the so-called local ...

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Forget Organic. Eat Local.

The best food you can eat may be in your own backyard. Here is one man’s quest for the perfect apple.

By: John Cloud

Not long ago I had an apple problem. Wavering in the produce section of a Manhattan grocery store, I was unable to decide between an organic apple and a nonorganic apple (which was labeled conventional, since that sounds better than “sprayed with pesticides that might kill you”). It shouldn’t have been a tough choice–who wants to eat pesticide ...

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Twelve Lessons on Water Conservation from Traditional Farmers of the Colorado Plateau

The cultivation and irrigation of crops adapted to an arid climate began on the Colorado Plateau more than four thousand years ago, as we know from desiccated corncobs found near Zuni, Black Mesa, and Canyon de Chelly. An unbroken chain of some 160 generations has been engaged in rain-fed and runoff-supplemented production of food, fiber, and dyes with seeds and water-conserving practices adapted to the peculiar soils and microclimates of this region. Many environmental conditions and agricultural technologies have changed, ...

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American Terroir

Sit down at the table with your countrymen & friends
And ask your lips, tongues, minds & bellies some questions,
Questions that remind us that our bodies & spirits
Are either nurtured by place
Or swallowed up by tasteless placelessness.

Ask aloud: Just what exactly is it
That we want to have cross our lips,
To roll off our tongues & down our throats
To be transformed & conjured into something
Altogether new by thousands of gut microbes
To surge into ...

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In Praise, and in Appraisal of, the Working Landscapes of the West

By: Gary Paul Nabhan with Ken Meter

The simplest fact about Western ranches tends to be the one which most folks tend to forget: raising range-fed livestock is one of the few economic activities that produces food — and potentially ecosystem health and financial wealth– by keeping landscapes relatively wild, diverse and resilient.

Only a small percentage of the foods eaten by humankind come from wildlands. Yes, livestock are given supplemental feed during drought, pregnancy, or just before slaughter, but the bulk ...

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Home Cooking

By: Gary Paul Nabhan

November/December 2006

STRANGE DISHES ARE POPPING UP AT PICNICS, potlucks, and feasts all across North America. In the Pacific Northwest, you might sample pit-steamed blue camas bulbs; lunch in the Southeast might be accompanied by a glass of scuppernong wine; and a Southwestern meal might end with saguaro fruit syrup over mesquite bread. After years in the culinary wilderness, these and hundreds of other endemic foods are coming ...

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Endangered List Created for Native Foods

NPR

by Ted Robbins

Weekend Edition Sunday , December 18, 2005 · Political boundaries often seem artificial, based on a long-ago treaty or current party registration. The boundaries of North America’s cornbread, salmon and clambake nations are rooted in climate, geography and tradition. But the culinary heritage embodied by those names may be in peril.

Cornbread nation? That’s a construct of the RAFT coalition (Renewing America’s Food Traditions), which came up with a map of North America based on ...

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Endangered List Created for Native Foods

by Ted Robbins
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=5058472

Listen to this Interview

Political boundaries often seem artificial, based on a long-ago treaty or current party registration. The boundaries of North America’s cornbread, salmon and clambake nations are rooted in climate, geography and tradition. But the culinary heritage embodied by those names may be in peril.

Cornbread nation? That’s a construct of the RAFT coalition (Renewing America’s Food Traditions), which came up with ...

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Culinary Call of the Wild

Chefs, NAU tout value of foraging for native foods

Karen Fernau
The Arizona Republic
Nov. 9, 2005 12:00 AM

COTTONWOOD – On a recent Tuesday, chef Tom Pristash drove up to the rolling pastures here to forage for lamb’s quarter, dandelions, mesquite beans and stinging nettles with a group of Northern Arizona University scientists.

The next week, he used that harvest and other wild food to create mesquite bean-crusted sea bass, sautéed amaranth leaves and roasted lobster mushrooms at Alchemy at CopperWynd ...

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Chefs Collaborative Renews America’s Food Traditions

Food Experts Unite to Realize, Restore and Revitalize Authentically American Foods and Traditions

(Boston, Mass…October 6, 2005) Chefs Collaborative, a national organization of chefs, individuals and organizations dedicated to advancing a more sustainable food supply, has become an influential partner in the new Renewing America’s Food Traditions (RAFT) project. RAFT was launched in the spring of 2005 by seven of the most prominent food, agriculture, education and conservation organizations in the United States as the first nationwide eco-gastronomic campaign. Uniting ...

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How Green Is Our Valley

Networks of local food growers, restaurants, and farmers’ markets promote the joys of regional cuisine: flavor, prosperity, and the family farm.

by Gary Paul Nabhan

One recent Sunday, I ate dinner at a community center on a Navajo reservation in Leupp, Arizona, not far from the Grand Falls of the Little Colorado River. A heavy fog had settled over the Painted Desert, but as we sat down to our meal, the fog lifted, revealing the dusty soil from which the foods we ...

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National Media Coverage and Grant Funding Launches Campaign to Rescue America’s Endangered Foods

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact: Gary Nabhan, PhD., or Ashley Rood
Center for Sustainable Environments
Northern Arizona University
PO Box 5765
Flagstaff, Arizona 86011-5765
928.523.0637
gpnabhan@email.arizona.edu
ashley.rood@nau.edu
www.environment.nau.edu

NAU’s RAFT Project Sets Sail:

National Media Coverage and Grant Funding Launches Campaign to Rescue America’s Endangered Foods

FLAGSTAFF, Ariz—Renewing America’s Food Traditions (RAFT), a national campaign facilitated by NAU’s Center for Sustainable Environments, was honored by Saveur Magazine as one of the 100 best food stories of 2005. ...

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