Collaborative Conservation

Earth Day

You could feel that spring had come to the Berkshires after a long and gray winter. Wherever we went around Great Barrington, farmers and gardeners were hoeing the ground, planting seeds, adjusting water lines, patching up chicken coops, or moving livestock between pastures. By noon on Saturday, many of us congregated at the Route 7 Grill near Great Barrington, to sample and discuss the foods and brews unique to the Berkshires, and ponder what they meant to our society as ...

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Weekday – The Diversity of Seeds

The Diversity of Seeds

Time: 54:01 minute audio
Date: January 8th, 2008
Publisher:
KUOW – 94.9 FM

Steve Scher talked to Gary Nabhan in January (KUOW) about the Diversity of Seeds, and you can listen to it at KUOW or below. Gary joins the program about 31 minutes into the clip. Listen to the entire show. It is very educational!

 

 

 

 

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Taking Stock of Successes with Local Foods

It was a wild way to break in the New Year, sharing local game and fish with hunters who donated their venison, pronghorn antelope backstrap and javelina “pork roasts” to their friends at the Cattle Baron in Flagstaff, Arizona. As we were sitting waiting for the first meat to come out of the roasting pit, I began to daydream about whether such an event would have even been “on my screen” some twenty years ago, as the local foods movement was ...

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Some Like It Hot

Listen to this Interview

CURWOOD: Those red hot chili peppers that appear next to entrees on many restaurant menus today can mean different things to different people. Some might consider them a hot, yet savory, challenge, while others see them as red flags – a warning to sensitive taste buds.

Whether you like your food spicy or not is a personal choice, but as Gary Nabhan contends, it’s also likely to be ...

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The Geography of Flavor

Bringing a European Idea Down to Earth: Producers, Farmers Pin Hopes on the Appeal of ‘Terroir’

By Jane Black Washington Post Staff Writer
Wednesday, August 22, 2007; Page F01

It was a risky move back in 2004 for Arlin Wasserman to launch his Minneapolis consultancy, Changing Tastes. His expertise: the esoteric concept of “terroir,” a French term that literally translates as terrain but has come to mean the way foods and wine express the soil, climate, ...

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Arabic in the Saddle

By Gary Paul Nabhan

Half a world away from where they originated, Arabic terms for horses, horsemen, and the tack that links them have found a new home in the desert Southwest of the United States. These terms came from Arabic into Spanish, and then into American English when the Spanish and the “Anglo” traditions met.

In the early eighth century, a Muslim army of Arabs and North African Berbers conquered much of the Iberian Peninsula. In its south, a region ...

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Localvore Hero

Talking maple syrup with a Southwest grow-it guru

by: Suzanne Podhaizer (08/08/07)

Gary Paul Nabhan has hunted wild peccaries, pit-roasted cactus flowers, and won a MacArthur “genius” fellowship. This past weekend, he was the keynote speaker at the 12th Annual Vermont Fresh Network Forum. The theme of the gathering was “Eat It to Save It” and focused on bringing back indigenous foods, such as heirloom veggies and heritage animal breeds that are becoming extinct. ...

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Long Before the First Thanksgiving

By: Gary Paul Nabhan, RAFT founder

Gary Paul Nabhan is a MacArthur Fellow, cofounder of Native Seeds/SEARCH, and author of numerous books and articles on ethnobotany, nutrition, and plant conservation.

Try to recall the most remarkable lunch you’ve ever had in a grade school. Mine was remarkable not only because of the food that was served, but also because of the people—both young and old—with whom I ate. It was the people’s cultural traditions and their link with their distinctive ...

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The Beginning and the End of the Colorado River: Protecting the Sources, Ensuring Its Courses

Dedicated to Anita Alvarez de Williams, Nuestra Señora de la Delta

During the drought year of 2002, front-page headlines in Arizona’s largest newspaper declared “Colorado River Not Doing Job.” It was one of several notices making the national and regional headlines that year that referred to the worst drought to hit the bulk of the Colorado River basin in a century or more. In reading the Arizona Republic article that morning, I presumed that the journalists responsible for it understood ...

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A Terroir-ist’s Manifesto for Eating in Place

Know where your food has come from
through knowing those who produced it for you,
from farmer to forager, rancher or fisher
to earthworms building a deeper, richer soil,
to the heirloom vegetable, the nitrogen-fixing legume,
the pollinator, the heritage breed of livestock,
& the sourdough culture rising in your flour.

Know where your food has come from
by the very way it tastes:
its freshness telling you
how far it may have traveled,
the hint of mint in the cheese
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In Praise, and in Appraisal of, the Working Landscapes of the West

By: Gary Paul Nabhan with Ken Meter

The simplest fact about Western ranches tends to be the one which most folks tend to forget: raising range-fed livestock is one of the few economic activities that produces food — and potentially ecosystem health and financial wealth– by keeping landscapes relatively wild, diverse and resilient.

Only a small percentage of the foods eaten by humankind come from wildlands. Yes, livestock are given supplemental feed during drought, pregnancy, or just before slaughter, but the bulk ...

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Home Cooking

By: Gary Paul Nabhan

November/December 2006

 

STRANGE DISHES ARE POPPING UP AT PICNICS, potlucks, and feasts all across North America. In the Pacific Northwest, you might sample pit-steamed blue camas bulbs; lunch in the Southeast might be accompanied by a glass of scuppernong wine; and a Southwestern meal might end with saguaro fruit syrup over mesquite bread. After years in the culinary wilderness, these and hundreds of other endemic foods are coming ...

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Seri Indian Conservation Collaboration Receives International Award For World Oceans Day

In a press conference and World Oceans Day banquet in Washington, D.C. on June 7th, six prominent environmental organizations honored a grassroots effort of Native American youth for their protection and monitoring of endangered sea turtles that has been facilitated by Dr. Laurie Monti and Dr. Gary Nabhan from Northern Arizona University’s Center for Sustainable Environments and Applied Indigenous Studies. This year’s Ocean Revolution Native Oceans Award went to the Grupo Tortuguero Comcaac of Sonora, Mexico — a coalition of ...

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The Greening of Americas Campuses

The largest university in Oregon is camouflaged, its many parts spread among the tight urban canyons of downtown Portland.

But one building at Portland State University stands out. It has a roof of grass, plants and gravel, like a slice of the high desert on the wet side of Oregon. It is 10 stories high, and inside, all the mechanical organs work with so little waste – pumping water, air and electricity to the 400 residents of the dormitory and, on ...

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Endangered List Created for Native Foods

NPR

by Ted Robbins

Weekend Edition Sunday , December 18, 2005 · Political boundaries often seem artificial, based on a long-ago treaty or current party registration. The boundaries of North America’s cornbread, salmon and clambake nations are rooted in climate, geography and tradition. But the culinary heritage embodied by those names may be in peril.

Cornbread nation? That’s a construct of the RAFT coalition (Renewing America’s Food Traditions), which came up with a map of North America based on ...

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Culinary Call of the Wild

Chefs, NAU tout value of foraging for native foods

Karen Fernau
The Arizona Republic
Nov. 9, 2005 12:00 AM

COTTONWOOD – On a recent Tuesday, chef Tom Pristash drove up to the rolling pastures here to forage for lamb’s quarter, dandelions, mesquite beans and stinging nettles with a group of Northern Arizona University scientists.

The next week, he used that harvest and other wild food to create mesquite bean-crusted sea bass, sautéed amaranth leaves and roasted lobster mushrooms at Alchemy at CopperWynd ...

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Chefs Collaborative Renews America’s Food Traditions

Food Experts Unite to Realize, Restore and Revitalize Authentically American Foods and Traditions

(Boston, Mass…October 6, 2005) Chefs Collaborative, a national organization of chefs, individuals and organizations dedicated to advancing a more sustainable food supply, has become an influential partner in the new Renewing America’s Food Traditions (RAFT) project. RAFT was launched in the spring of 2005 by seven of the most prominent food, agriculture, education and conservation organizations in the United States as the first nationwide eco-gastronomic campaign. Uniting ...

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How Green Is Our Valley

Networks of local food growers, restaurants, and farmers’ markets promote the joys of regional cuisine: flavor, prosperity, and the family farm.

by Gary Paul Nabhan

One recent Sunday, I ate dinner at a community center on a Navajo reservation in Leupp, Arizona, not far from the Grand Falls of the Little Colorado River. A heavy fog had settled over the Painted Desert, but as we sat down to our meal, the fog lifted, revealing the dusty soil from which the foods we ...

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National Media Coverage and Grant Funding Launches Campaign to Rescue America’s Endangered Foods

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact: Gary Nabhan, PhD., or Ashley Rood
Center for Sustainable Environments
Northern Arizona University
PO Box 5765
Flagstaff, Arizona 86011-5765
928.523.0637
gpnabhan@email.arizona.edu
ashley.rood@nau.edu
www.environment.nau.edu

NAU’s RAFT Project Sets Sail:

National Media Coverage and Grant Funding Launches Campaign to Rescue America’s Endangered Foods

FLAGSTAFF, Ariz—Renewing America’s Food Traditions (RAFT), a national campaign facilitated by NAU’s Center for Sustainable Environments, was honored by Saveur Magazine as one of the 100 best food stories of 2005. ...

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