• Fri
    04
    Jan
    2019
    1:30 pmTucson, AZ

    Gary will give an interview for KUAT-TV with host Tony Paniagua.

    University of Arizona

    Tucson, AZ

    1:30 pm

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  • Tue
    08
    Jan
    2019
    6 pm – 8:30 pmChevy Chase, MD
    Gary Nabhan will give a 20-minute talk followed by Q&A. Refreshments will be provided.
    Perennial Garden Club Chevy Chase Village Hall

    5700 Cedar Parkway
    Chevy Chase, MD 20815

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  • Sun
    13
    Jan
    2019
    5:00 pmPhone
    Eating Matters Talk Show • Heritage Radio • Host Jenna Liut

    5 pm PST

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  • Mon
    14
    Jan
    2019
    1:45 pmTucson, AZ
    Moderator and host for a University of Arizona/USDA ARS/Crop Diversity Trust forum on Crop Wild Relatives

    Moderator and host for a University of Arizona/USDA ARS/Crop Diversity Trust forum on Crop Wild Relatives, including an event on campus at ENR2 Haury Auditorium, afternoon workshop on Tumamoc Hill, pay-in-advance wild relatives banquet and field trips.

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  • Tue
    19
    Feb
    2019
    7:00 pmIowa City, IA
    Prairie Lights • Food from the Radical Center

    MacArthur award-winning “father of the local food movement” Gary Paul Nabhan will read from and talk about Food from the Radical Center: Healing Our Land and Communities. In this book, Nabhan shares inspiring stories about food and land restoration projects that bring communities together across the political divide. Nabhan is personally engaged as an orchard-keeper, wild foods forager, and pollinator habitat restorationist working from his small farm in Patagonia, Arizona near the Mexican border. He has helped forge "the radical center" for collaborative conservation among farmers, ranchers, indigenous peoples and environmentalists in the West. Nabhan is the author of books including Coming Home to Eat, Cumin Camels & Caravans, Desert Smells Like Rain, and the recent Mesquite: An Arboreal Love Affair.

    He is a research scientist and the W.K. Kellogg Endowed Chair in Sustainable Food Systems at the University of Arizona Southwest Center, where he works to build a more just, nutritious, sustainable, and climate-resilient foodshed spanning the U.S./Mexico border.

    Prairie Lights
    15 South Dubuque St.
    Iowa City, IA 52240

    07:00 PM

     

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  • Wed
    20
    Feb
    2019
    Thu
    21
    Feb
    2019
    All Day EventsMount Vernon, IA
    Cornell College • Food from the Radical Center

    Wednesday, February 20, 2019
    Dinner (5:30-6:45 pm)
    Public Presentation (7:00-8:00 pm)

    Thursday, February 21, 2019
    Classroom Visit (9:00-11:00 am)

     

    About Cornell College

    Located in Mount Vernon, Iowa, Cornell was the first college west of the Mississippi to grant women the same rights and privileges as men, and, in 1858, to award a degree to a woman.

    In 1978 Cornell faculty adopted the One Course At A Time curriculum, transforming the way teaching and learning happen at Cornell. With the 1996 publication of Loren Pope’s Colleges That Change Lives, Cornell’s life-changing education was formally recognized. Cornell continues to be recognized with each new edition.

     

    About Gary

    Gary Paul Nabhan is the Kellogg Endowed Chair at the University of Arizona's Southwest Center. He is author or editor of more than thirty books, including Growing Food in a Hotter, Drier Land; Where Our Food Comes From; and Renewing America's Food Traditions. Honored with a MacArthur "genius" award, a Lannan Literary Fellowship, the John Burroughs Medal for nature writing, and other awards, Gary is recognized as the father of the local food movement.

    Cornell College
    600 First Street SW
    Mount Vernon, IA 52314

     

     

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  • Sat
    23
    Feb
    2019
    All Day EventRosemont, Illinois

    Wild Things Conference - Gary Nabhan - Keynote Speaker

    Stephens Convention Center
    5555 N River Rd
    Rosemont, Illinois 60018

    About Wild Things Community:

    We are the Wild Things community: collaborative, optimistic, effective. Recognized as one of the nation’s largest networks of people engaged with nature, we enjoy and protect Chicago area wild lands and wildlife.

    We are stewards, monitors, advocates, educators, Chicago Wilderness members, volunteers, and staff, all working together to promote and protect the prairies, woodlands, wetlands, wild yards, and natural parks of northeast Illinois, northwest Indiana, and southeast Wisconsin.

    We come together in person every two years at the Wild Things Conference. And in between, this website celebrates the week-in, week-out experiences of the community as we seek to investigate, enjoy, and protect local nature.

    About Gary:

    Gary Paul Nabhan is the Kellogg Endowed Chair at the University of Arizona's Southwest Center. He is author or editor of more than thirty books, including Growing Food in a Hotter, Drier Land; Where Our Food Comes From; and Renewing America's Food Traditions. Honored with a MacArthur "genius" award, a Lannan Literary Fellowship, the John Burroughs Medal for nature writing, and other awards, Gary is recognized as the father of the local food movement.

     

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  • Sat
    02
    Mar
    2019
    Sun
    03
    Mar
    2019
    9:30am to 5:30pmTucson, AZ
    Tucson Festival of Books

    University of Arizona Campus • March 2 - 3, 2019

    Two panel discussions, one each day with Aby Mogollon of UA Press as main contact.

    Tucson, AZ

    9:30am to 5:30pm

    All Day Events

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  • Wed
    06
    Mar
    2019
    6:00pm - 7:30pmDoylestown, PA
    Delaware Valley University • Lecture

    Gary Paul Nabhan will be presenting a lecture on his book “Food from the Radical Center,” at Delaware Valley University on Wednesday, March 6. The event will be held from 6 to 7:30 p.m. in the Life Sciences Building auditorium. All are welcome, and there is no cost to attend. Guests do not need to register in advance. There will be a book signing at the event.

    “Food from the Radical Center” discusses the collaboration of diverse communities in the U.S. that are working to revive the country’s systems for producing healthy, local food. In a divided nation, efforts to support healthy food production is bringing people are bringing people with different political views, cultures, and religions together and providing hope for future conservation initiatives. Land and rare species restoration as described in Nabhan’s book have brought economic, ecological, and social success to U.S. communities.

    Nabhan’s 50 years of community-based project experience provides a unique perspective on the conservation of biological and cultural diversity. “Food from the Radical Center” offers an inclusive vision of environmentalism and stories of healing through the community-based recovery of food-producing landscapes.

    “Food from the Radical Center” is available for purchase at the university bookstore.

    Nabhan is an award-winning author and agrarian activist whose 36 books have been translated into eight languages. He is an agricultural ecologist, ethnobiologist, and the Kellogg Endowed Chair in Southwestern Borderlands Food and Water Security at the University of Arizona. Nabhan is considered a pioneer of the local food movement and has been honored with a MacArthur Genius award and awards from the Societies for Conservation Biology and Ethnobiology. He raises heritage fruits, heirloom chilis, and spices near the Mexican border.

    The presentation is being sponsored by the University’s One Health Working Group, the Food Systems Institute of Delaware Valley University, and the Heritage Conservancy.

     

    Life Sciences Building Auditorium
    700 E Butler Ave
    Doylestown, PA 18901

     

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  • Tue
    02
    Apr
    2019
    Thu
    04
    Apr
    2019
    All Day EventsDes Moines, Iowa
    Celebrating Crop Diversity: Connecting Agriculture, Public Gardens, and Science

    Plenary Talk with Gary Nabhan

    Thursday April 4th

    During eras of political, economic, and environmental stress, humanity turns to consider a broader range of options than typically employed during “business as usual.” This is one of those times - when agriculture needs to re-diversify to add resilience to the food system that we depend on for survival. A wide array of activities led by a broad diversity of land managers, botanists, indigenous harvesters, farmers, and many others are illuminating the way forward. This is “conservation you can taste,” where what is saved and restored is also savored. Gary Paul Nabhan, W.K. Kellogg endowed chair in borderlands food and water security at the University of Arizona, will take us on a journey of discovery around North America to celebrate efforts that are bringing people together to renew and care for the foods they enjoy.

    8:30 am

    Des Moines, Iowa

    See: https://www.publicgardens.org/professional-development/2019-symposia/celebrating-crop-diversity

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  • Mon
    08
    Apr
    2019
    Thu
    11
    Apr
    2019
    All Day EventsOlympia, WA
    Food and Agriculture Lecture Series • Evergreen State College

    Ecological Agriculture and Food Systems

    Evergreen State College
    2700 Evergreen Pkwy NW
    Olympia WA  98505

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  • Fri
    12
    Apr
    2019
    Sun
    14
    Apr
    2019
    All Day EventCottonwood, AZ
    Rocky Mountain Seed Alliance • Lecture

    Grain School – Arizona

    With a focus on ancient and heritage grains, you will learn expert techniques and hands-on skills to grow, harvest, mill, market, and bake with locally adapted grains. Nutritional values of ancient grains will be presented, along with the ecological benefits of adding grains to your garden or farm portfolio. Grain collaborations will also be explored and encouraged.

    See: https://rockymountainseeds.org/index.php?option=com_civicrm&task=civicrm/event/info&Itemid=267&reset=1&id=33

    3360 E Hwy 89A
    Cottonwood, AZ 86326

     

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  • Wed
    17
    Apr
    2019
    7:00 pm - 8:30 pmFlagstaff, AZ
    Northern Arizona University • Food from the Radical Center • Lecture

    World-renowned writer, ethnobotanist, and conservationist Gary Paul Nabhan is returning to Flagstaff April 17 to deliver the annual Olajos-Goslow Lecture, presented by the Landscape Conservation Initiative and Sustainable Communities program.

    Room: High Country Conference Center
    Event Website: https://www.facebook.com/events/714918792243624/
    Event Cost: Free

    7:00 pm - 8:30 pm

     

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  • Tue
    23
    Apr
    2019
    Sun
    05
    May
    2019
    All Day EventsTucson, AZ
    Agave Heritage Festival

    Agave Heritage Festival began in 2008 as Agave Fest, a Cinco de Mayo celebration featuring tequila tastings and a tequila “Iron Bar Chef” competition at the historic Hotel Congress. As the festival grew in the following years, the number of different agave spirits featured at the event more than doubled, and food specials were elevated from cheap eats to regionally focused culinary treats.

    By 2015 — the same year that Tucson was the first U.S. city to receive the UNESCO City of Gastronomy designation — Agave Fest had gone from a tequila-lover’s Cinco de Mayo celebration to an event rooted in the historical and cultural significance of the agave plant. With seminars, a fundraising Agave Dinner, tastings of spirits unavailable in the United States, and a cultural and historical art exhibit, Agave Fest had begun to realize its true potential.

    The agave plant’s inextricable role in the culture and history of the Arizona-Mexico borderlands region became a central focus of Agave Fest, leading to the creation of Agave Heritage Week in 2016 and the expansion into Agave Heritage Festival in 2017.

    Today, Agave Heritage Festival is a city-wide, ten-day destination event that spotlights the sustainability of the southwest region through the lens of the agave plant. Agave Heritage Festival celebrates the unique importance of the agave plant and the borderlands culture with seminars, trade shows, and world-class culinary events.

    See: https://www.agaveheritagefestival.com/

     

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  • Tue
    30
    Apr
    2019
    8:30 am - 9:30 amGilbert, AZ
    Arizona Food & Farm Forum • Keynote • Food from the Radical Center

    The Arizona Food & Farm Forum is a conference for producers, food entrepreneurs, and local food advocates, programmed to change the way our desert state feeds itself. The event features networking sessions, nationally-acclaimed keynote speakers, instructional workshops, and the opportunity to grow your local food community.

    Click here for tickets, sponsorship opportunities, and program details.

    The Farm at Agritopia
    3000 East Ray Road
    Gilbert, AZ, 85296
    United States

    Gary Paul Nabhan

    A first-generation Lebanese American, Nabhan has been working with, and learning from farmers and foragers in several indigenous communities on both sides of the U.S./Mexico border for over thirty years.

    Co-founder of Native Seeds/SEARCH and numerous other key organizers in the southwest, Nabhan currently serves as the Kellogg Endowed Chair in Southwestern Borderlands Food and Water Security at the University of Arizona Southwest Center.

    Join Nabhan as he presents success stories from Arizona, highlighting how working for a healthier food system is one of the few goals that bridge the many divides in America today, by uniting urban and rural, left and right, immigrant and indigenous, producer and consumer in ways that build lasting collaborations.

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  • Sun
    23
    Jun
    2019
    8:00 am - 8:45 amTucson, AZ
    Location: Native Seeds/SEARCH Conservation Center
    Address: 3584 East River Rd, Tucson, AZ
    Date: Sunday, June 23, 2019
    Time: 8:00 am - 8:45 am

    Nabhan is personally engaged as an orchard-keeper, wild foods forager, and pollinator habitat restorationist working from his small farm in Patagonia, Arizona near the Mexican border. He has helped forge "the radical center" for collaborative conservation among farmers, ranchers, indigenous peoples and environmentalists in the West. Nabhan is the author of books including Coming Home to Eat, Cumin Camels & Caravans, Desert Smells Like Rain, and the recent Mesquite: An Arboreal Love Affair.

    He is a research scientist and the W.K. Kellogg Endowed Chair in Sustainable Food Systems at the University of Arizona Southwest Center, where he works to build a more just, nutritious, sustainable, and climate-resilient foodshed spanning the U.S./Mexico border.

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  • Fri
    11
    Oct
    2019
    Sat
    12
    Oct
    2019
    All Day EventsBerkeley, CA

    The Garden is pleased to announce Connecting Plants and People: An Ethnobotanical Conversation, a two-day international symposium. The first day, hosted at International House, will feature prominent speakers from around the globe and the Bay Area. The second day will include hands-on workshops and tours of the UC Botanical Garden exploring culinary medicinal, dye, and many other uses of plants. We hope you’ll join us for this important conversation and celebration of plants in our daily lives.

    Alejandro de Avila‘s family roots lie in Oaxaca, San Luis Potosí and Finland. He received a Master’s in psychobiology and then a Ph.D. in anthropology at UC Berkeley. He is the founding director of the Oaxaca Ethnobotanical Garden, and the curator and adviser of the Oaxaca Textile Museum. His interest in Mesoamerican cultures and plants goes back to a childhood spent near Chapultepec, a magnificent park since Aztec times that houses the National Museum of Anthropology. As a teenager, he became an apprentice at a weaving and dyeing workshop in Oaxaca.

    Professor Tom Carlson is a medical doctor and botanist and faculty member of Integrative Biology at UC Berkeley. His primary research interests are in medical/nutritional ethnobotany, ethnoecology, ethnoepidemiology, and the ecology and evolution of human disease. Dr. Carlson has conducted research with, and provided medical care to, forty different ethnolinguistic groups in fifteen different countries in Africa, Asia, Pacific Islands, South America, and North America collaborating with indigenous/local people to learn about their ethnoempirical and ethnotheoretical perspectives on medical and nutritional ethnobotany, ethnotaxonomy, ethnoecology, and ethnoepidemiology.

    Christine Hastorf is a professor in the Anthropology Department at UC Berkeley,  the Director of the Archaeological Research Facility and McCown Archaeobotany Laboratory, and the Curator of South American Archaeology at the Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology. Her research focuses on agriculture, political complexity, gender, and the methodologies that lead to a better understanding of the past through the study of plant-use. She has written on agricultural production, cooking practices and what shifts in these suggest about social relations, gender relations surrounding plant use, the rise of complex society, political change and the symbolic use of plants in the legitimation of authority, fuel use and related symbolism, and plant domestication as part of social identity construction and ritual and social identity.

    Judith Larner Lowry has been the proprietor of Larner Seeds, specialists in California native plants, for the last 42 years. With a background in anthropology and horticulture, she worked first as seed propagator and wildland seed collector at Yerba Buena Nursery in Woodside, Ca, then for seedsman Craig Dremann of Redwood City Seeds. She founded Larner Seeds in 1977 and has been engaged since then in exploring and trialling dozens of California native species for garden use, for habitat, and for Wild Food Gardens. Her work with the public has educated her in ways to engage Californians in the preservation and restoration of California’s ecosystems.  She has written three influential books on these subjects, including The Landscaping Ideas of Jays, Gardening with a Wild Heart ( UC Press), and California Foraging (Timber Press) as well as chapbooks for Larner Seeds, such as The Real California Cuisine.

    Kent Lightfoot is currently a professor in the Anthropology Department, Curator of North American Archaeology in the Phoebe A Hearst Museum of Anthropology, and Faculty Associate in the Archaeological Research Facility at UC Berkeley. He has directed archaeological projects in New England, the American Southwest, and along the Pacific Coast of North America. In the last ten years, he has focused his studies on the impressive shell mounds of the greater San Francisco Bay, the Russian colony of Fort Ross (1812-1843), and nearby historic Spanish missions in northern California, and landscape management practices employed by complex hunter-hunters in central California. The interdisciplinary nature of this work has been facilitated by the Berkeley Initiative in Global Change Biology at UC Berkeley.

    Gary Martin, a cultural anthropologist and ethnobotanist, is the founder of Global Diversity Foundation, Global Environments Summer Academy and Global Environments Network. Gary was a lecturer in the School of Anthropology and Conservation at the University of Kent from 1998 to 2011 and a Fellow of the Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society from 2010 to 2012. Twice a Fulbright scholar, he has a Ph.D. in anthropology from UC Berkeley and an undergraduate degree in botany. His applied research and teaching on conservation and ethnobotany have taken him to more than 50 countries over the last 30 years.

    Gary Nabhan is an Agricultural Ecologist, Ethnobotanist, Ecumenical Franciscan Brother, and author whose work has focused primarily on the interaction of biodiversity and cultural diversity of the arid binational Southwest. He is considered a pioneer in the local food movement and the heirloom seed saving movement. He has an M.S. in plant sciences and a Ph.D. in the interdisciplinary arid lands resource sciences from the University of Arizona. He co-founded Native Seeds/SEARCH, served as Director of Conservation, Research and Collections at both the Desert Botanical Garden and Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum, became the founding director of the Center for Sustainable Environments at Northern Arizona University, and founded the Center for Regional Food Studies.

    Elena Goded Rambaud is a biologist, has a Phd in Educational Sciences, and over the last 25 years lectured in the Science Didactics department at the UNED University in Madrid.  She is also an associate lecturer at the Entertainment Technology Centre in the Spanish Ministry of Culture and currently a member of the Chilean National Committee for the Textile Conservation. She is a natural dyes and textile specialist. Over the last 25 years, she had lectured on textiles, natural dyes, botany and history of costume. She has been a reputed consultant for different entities and projects related to textile matters.

    Peg Schafer has a background in nursery management and farming and is the owner/operator of the Chinese Medicinal Herb Farm outside Petaluma. Since 1997 the farm has grown out more than 260 different herb crops and has sold to practitioners, pharmacies, product manufacturers, researchers, retailers, and the general public. The farm functions partly as an experimental operation trialing Asian herbs compiling an extensive database on the cultivation of herbs of medicinal and economic interest. She is a frequent lecturer at colleges of Oriental medicine, conferences and farming events, where she addresses herb quality, cultivation and conservation, and issues affecting Chinese herbs.

    Jennifer Sowerwine is a cooperative extension specialist in the Department of Environmental Science and Policy Management at UC Berkeley, where she also completed her Ph.D. in Wildland Resource Science. Her work aims to engage diverse stakeholders across the spectrum of the food system through participatory and collaborative research methodologies, exploring effective communication strategies and culturally appropriate methods, materials and places to ensure diverse representation, input, and participation. Her approach is to shift from “extending” knowledge and information toward participatory needs assessment and co-creation of research and educational materials that respond to public needs and foster peer learning networks.

    Yoshiko Wada is an artist, curator, and author. She has curated exhibitions at the Textile Museum in Washington, DC, the Museum of Craft and Folk Art in San Francisco and the Jim Thompson Art Center in Bangkok, Thailand. Her own work has been exhibited widely since the 1970s, including the Smithsonian Institution’s Renwick Gallery and the International Textile Fair in Kyoto. She is president of World Shibori Network, founder of Slow Fiber Studios, producer of the Natural Dye Workshop film series and co-chair of the 10th International Shibori Symposium in Oaxaca, Mexico. For over forty years she has led dozens of art, architecture, and textile study tours to Japan, India, France, Italy, and China. In 2010, Yoshiko Wada was titled as a “Distinguished Craft Educator – Master of Medium” by the James Renwick Alliance.

     

    Friday, October 11 & Saturday, October 12

    For more information and attendance please visit:  https://botanicalgarden.berkeley.edu/public-programs/symposium

     

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  • Tue
    05
    Nov
    2019
    Fri
    08
    Nov
    2019
    All Day EventsSedona, Arizona

    Join us and help activate a coalition of engaged people to inspire and empower connections between disciplines. Interactions between naturalists and ecologists, psychologists, physicians, educators, artists, writers, and advocates will light a path that connects humans and nature through healing both the human and more-than-human world. This national confluence is dedicated to nurturing a sense of hope grounded in tangible, actionable outcomes. Participants will benefit from inspiration, innovation, cross-pollination, and depth in both plenary and breakout sessions.

    The gathering will be structured as a confluence between three primary tributaries— medicine, psychology, and natural history—with a rhythm of alternating plenary presentations from inspiring speakers and illuminating panels, smaller field workshops, and open space for emergent ideas. Throughout the 4 days and 3 nights of the gathering, we’ll integrate intellect, spirit, and experience while intertwining contemplation and wild nature. We anticipate almost 200 participants, from across North America and beyond.

    We intend to emerge with the strategies and skills to take this work into the wider world. The academic journal Ecopsychology has committed to engagement with this conference, with the intention of publishing a special section deriving from the gathering.

    Plenary Speakers

    Davona Blackhorse, M.A. is a Clinical and Mental Health Counselor who seeks to develop culturally appropriate therapy interventions that are inclusive of Native American healing practices. She is pursuing a PhD in Interdisciplinary Health with an emphasis in Psychosocial Health; her studies focus on the psychological impact of toxic land mining exposure on the Navajo Reservation and historical trauma among Native Americans.

    Michael Finkelstein, M.D., “the Slow Medicine Doctor,” trained in both Internal and Integrative-Holistic Medicine, is the author of Slow Medicine: Hope and Healing for Chronic Illness, and has been the medical director of major hospitals and health institutes, as well as having a private medical practice.

    Thomas L. Fleischner, Ph.D. is a naturalist and conservation biologist, the Executive Director of the Natural History Institute, Faculty Emeritus at Prescott College, and editor of the anthologies Nature, Love, Medicine: Essays On Wildness and Wellness and The Way of Natural History.

    Robert Greenway, M.S., Professor Emeritus, Psychology, Sonoma State University, developed programs in ecopsychology, The Wilderness Experience, and transpersonal psychology.  He has served on the staff of the Peace Corps, was Director of planning for University of California at Santa Cruz and manages an organic farm in Washington State.  He has written and spoken extensively on the field of ecopsychology and the human-nature relationship.

    Peter Kahn, Jr., Ph.D. is Editor-in-Chief of the journal, Ecopsychology, and co-editor of the books Ecopsychology: Science, Totems, and the Technological Species, and The Rediscovery of the Wild. He is a professor at the University of Washington, with appointments in the Department of Psychology and the School of Environmental and Forest Sciences.

    Robin Wall Kimmerer, Ph.D. is Professor of Environmental and Forest Biology and Director of the Center for Native Peoples and the Environment at the SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry, the author of Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge and the Teachings of Plants, and an enrolled member of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation.

    Kathleen Dean Moore, Ph.D. is an award-winning author of numerous books that integrate philosophical clarity with personal reflection and moral purpose, including Great Tide Rising: Towards Clarity and Moral Courage in an Age of Planetary Change.  She was distinguished Professor of Philosophy at Oregon State University before leaving academia to speak and write about the moral urgency of addressing climate change.

    Gary Paul Nabhan, Ph.D. is an ecologist, ethnobotanist, and author of more than 30 books on the relationship between nature and culture. Currently the Kellogg Endowed Chair in Southwestern Borderlands Food and Water Security at the University of Arizona’s Southwest Center, he is the recipient of numerous awards, including a MacArthur Fellowship.

    Anna O’Malley, M.D. is an Integrative Family and Community Medicine physician in West Marin, California, and is the founding Director of the Natura Institute for Ecology and Medicine in the Commonweal Garden. She guides people in the medicine of reconnecting to Nature, holds restorative retreats for physicians, and works toward infusing deep ecological consciousness into the art of healing.

    Laura Sewall, Ph.D., M.S.E.L., the author of Sight and Sensibility: The Ecopsychology of Perception, taught ecopsychology and environmental perception at Prescott and Bates colleges, and is Director of the Bates-Morse Mountain Conservation Area in coastal Maine. She has a doctorate in Visual Science and a master’s in environmental law.

    Brian Stafford, M.D., M.P.H. is a child psychiatrist, pediatrician, and ecotherapist.  He is the founder of WildernessIsMedicine.org and Eco-Psyche-Artistry.com, and leads wilderness healing journeys through these organizations and the Animas Valley Institute.

    Sara Warber, M.D. is Emeritus Professor of Family Medicine at the University of Michigan, former co-director of the university’s integrative medicine program, and Honorary Professor at the European Centre for Environment and Human Health. The co-author of Natural Products From Plants, her clinical practice included holistic women’s health and holistic herbal medicine.

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    Location: Sedona Mago Retreat Center

    Address: 3500 E Bill Gray Rd, Sedona, AZ 86336

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    More Information: https://naturalhistoryinstitute.org/reciprocal-healing/

     

     

     

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